• Working Overtime Could Increase Risk of Diabetes in Women

    Working overtime is already linked to increased anxiety and stress and chronic illness. The most recent research discovered the result of prolonged work hours. Researchers claim that hardworking people are more prone to develop type 2 diabetes.

    July 4, 2018 | Related: ,

    0

    diabetes, hard working women diabetes

    If you’re a woman and you’re working long hours, then you’re at high risk of developing diabetes, according to a study.

    Working overtime is already linked to increased anxiety and stress and chronic illness. The most recent research discovered the result of prolonged work hours. Researchers claim that hardworking people are more prone to develop type 2 diabetes.

    Researchers considered the data from more than 7,000 Canadians. They were tracked for more than 12 years. They discovered that women who regularly worked for more than 45 hours per week were 63 percent likely to develop diabetes compared to those who only worked less than 40 hours a week.

    The result was somewhat lowered when smoking, exercise, alcohol consumption and BMI were taken into consideration.

    Men who worked longer hours did not encounter a raised in danger of diabetes.

    In a 2016 study in Japan, researchers saw a link between diabetes threat and those workers who did greater than 45 hours of non-shift job or job that adapts a routine daytime schedule.

    A 2006 research study that concentrated on women discovered something similar. Working lengthy hours could have lots of various other unfavorable health repercussions. These would include heart troubles, as studies showed.

    A potential factor for gender distinction could relate to the kind of work that guys reported. In the research, a third of the males who were working long hours stated that they invested that time doing a mix of resting, standing and strolling. The guys’ higher degree of physical activity could help to clarify, partly, their reduced danger of having diabetes. The outcomes included in the expanding understanding of how work hours could influence health, particularly diabetes.

    Previous researches discovered that individuals working longer hours appeared to have a greater danger of suffering from diabetes compared to those who are working fewer hours.

    The majority of the studies included just males and females. Researchers did not discover a comparable break down of risk by skill degree. However, they noted that there were some instances of diabetes among the individuals with low skilled jobs. For that reason, their study could not have analytical power to get a legitimate pattern.

    Diabetes is a common disease. It can’t be cured but it can be managed. It’s a killer and people have to recognize the aspects besides medication and therapy that could step in to avoid it.

    This disease could be a substantial problem on the world’s economic situation. Experts believe that 20 years from now, more than 400 million individuals will have diabetes. It is a 50 percent boost from the number of individuals who had diabetes in 2010.

    Experts recommend both men and women to avoid working longer hours as their health depends on it.

    About the author

    Janey Danes Janey Danes started her career as a part-time article writer, editor and proofreader in 2008. She specializes in topics related to health, travel, technology, family, and spiritual life. Danes is a licensed medical technologist and she holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Information Technology. She is also a contributor to Travel Philippines | Entertainment and Medical Technology Avenue. You can also find her on Google+.

    Speak Now ... Or Forever Hold Your Peace

  • Vim Ch’i

    Vim Ch’i is an online health shop that delivers herbal life tea for weight loss, fitness products, and natural supplements, which bring back your Vim (energy and enthusiasm) and Chi (vital energy to animate the body internally), straight to your door.

    Be sure to check out our blog posts written by our fantastic resident writers and guest bloggers.

    If you wish to contribute articles, infographics, etc. to our website, please email us vimchidavao[at]gmail.com